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Sci-Fi Wall 004

Sale! Sci-Fi Wall 004  

Sci-Fi Wall 004

€ 2.00 € 1.00

This is a sci-fi related surface textures with their accompanying color or RBG, bump or normal, glossiness and specular maps. Many of which are compatible to each other and you can easily create much more unique surface structures by combining different maps with each other.
Sizes is 2048 x 2048, depending on their shape and the intended surface area they are supposed to cover. They are provided as lossless TGA files.
All textures are seamless or tileable and designed to fit a quadratic square matrix for more ease of use. E.g. one texture would cover 1×1 units.



SKU: S3D-SCIFI-WALL-004. Categories: , .
Description

Product Description

This is a sci-fi related surface textures with their accompanying color or RBG, bump or normal, glossiness and specular maps. Many of which are compatible to each other and you can easily create much more unique surface structures by combining different maps with each other.
Sizes is 2048 x 2048, depending on their shape and the intended surface area they are supposed to cover. They are provided as lossless TGA files.
All textures are seamless or tileable and designed to fit a quadratic square matrix for more ease of use. E.g. one texture would cover 1×1 units.

Color\ RGB map provided in file format *.TGA (2048 X 2048)
Diffuse map provided in file format *.TGA (2048 X 2048)
Gloss map provided in file format *.TGA (2048 X 2048)
Normal map provided in file format *.TGA(2048 X 2048)
Specular map provided in file format *.TGA(2048 X 2048)
Height map provided in file format *.TGA (2048 X 2048)

Essential terms for maps:
First things first, this tutorial is covering the Marmoset material system and how to achieve the most from your diffuse, normal, specular, and gloss maps while representing a variety of material types.
Let’s start by explaining what each map does and how it will relate to the 3D application material system.
There are more advanced features in all 3D applications and they some times can be different in rendering/shader system, but for the sake of simplicity we’re going to limit this tutorial to the four common texture maps in the default shader.
Don’t forget: Your specular and gloss values apply to dynamic lights as well as the default environment lighting.

Color\RGB – Baking a RGB map from your high poly model is a huge time saver allowing you to quickly extract selection masks that you can use as the basis of your texture. Assign basic materials to your high poly objects using red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow and white and then bake that down to a color map along with your normal map.

Diffuse– A diffuse map is a texture you use to define a surface’s main color. In order to work well with a normal map and a specular map, a good diffuse texture should not have any directional lighting included, it should only have generic “ambient occlusion”. Surface gets darker in deep cracks and around embossed details. If you are generating your normal maps from high-poly geometry, you should bake a matching ambient occlusion pass from the geometry and multiply this on top of your diffuse texture to make sure that the lighting matches the normal map.

Gloss – The gloss map is used to define the “sharpness” or “roughness” of the specular reflection highlight, essentially how wide or narrow the highlight is. Darker gloss values are used to define matte materials, while brighter gloss values are used to define glossy materials. In some 3D application you adjust the gloss value with the “Specular Sharpness” slider, and if you save a gloss map into the alpha channel of your specular map it will automatically use that for your gloss value. Be sure to save a 32 bit image otherwise your gloss map with not load.

Normal– Virtually all geometric surface detail should be represented in bump maps instead of drawn into the diffuse maps in the conventional style. This allows a single texture to take on different characteristics based on its interaction with lights. Ideally, local (or tangent-space) normal maps should be generated from high-poly geometry for the best consistency and surface detail. However, it is often necessary to create normal maps from source photography and textures. This can be done in Photoshop by using the NVidia Tools NormalMap Filter, or using a 3rd-party application such as Crazybump. Normal map provides per pixel lighting/shading information. Your normal map will be either generated from a high resolution model, or generated from a 2D bump map. You can add extra normal map detail to your baked map to help further define material properties, with the Nvidia Normal Map filter, Crazybump, nDo and other similar programs.

Height– A height map is a gray scale image, with black being the farthest distance away and white being the closest. An addition scale parameter is required when using height maps to determine how deep the image is supposed to be. You can’t properly cut and paste image fragments between height maps with different scale values without distorting the shading. You can add, subtract, airbrush, or smooth gray values by hand on a height map with predictable results.

Specular– Specular maps are the maps you use to define a surface’s shininess and highlight.
In other words specular map is used to define both the color and strength of the specular reflection highlights.

Cavity– cavity map is intended to help mimic Ambient Occlusion.
Occlusion – occlusion mapping is used to procedurally create 3D definition in textured surfaces.

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